6 Ways to Make a Calm Down Jar

Calm down jars are a must-have when there are children around, so I’m sharing six ways or recipes on how to make a calm down jar or glitter jar or some call it a mind jar. I want to give you six recipes here so that you can choose which one works best for you, or you can try them all.

How do you make a calm down jar- Here are six different recipes. 6 Ways to Make a Calm Down Jar by Preschool Inspirations

They provide healthy and effective ways for little ones to help soothe themselves, calm down, take deep breaths, and work through their emotions. I also use them as an addition in our play kitchen or in our quiet area or library area. Overall, they are just beautiful. We call them “sparkle bottles” in my preschool.

Since some locations have different or limited ingredients, I’m hoping that everyone can find one of these ways useful. Who knows, you may have all the ingredients in your home already to make one!

This post contains affiliate links for your convenience. Most of these products I found at my local grocery store or craft store for a much better deal than online. Liquid watercolor is not widely available though. You can find it easily online through Discount School Supply  or AmazonSome school supply stores and craft stores have recently started carrying them. I would call ahead before making a trip though!

You can see a video of four of the calm down jars on my facebook page or by clicking the photos I have below. If you are trying to figure which one has the speed and flow that you want, the video will give you a good idea of it.

6 Ways to Make a Calm Down Jar by Preschool Inspirations

Materials

You’ll need the following ingredients for all of these bottles.

Using glitter glue instead of fine glitter or Make it Glitter can cause the glitter to float longer, so keep that in mind when making your bottle. I would recommend putting glitter glue in with the hot water if that is the ingredient you choose.

If you use the Colorations Make It Glitter, the rest of it can be used to mix with tempera paint to make it glittery or tons more calm down jars.

Love the Calm Down Jars? You can also take a peek at my color mixing sensory bottles!

How to Make a Calm Down Jar with Glue

6 Ways to Make a Calm Down Jar by Preschool Inspirations Additional Ingredients:

Elmer’s Washable Clear Glue

This calm down jar is one of the most affordable bottles to make. I bought the glue on sale, but even at regular price, it’s still a good deal. If you choose not to use Elmer’s glue, it may change the proportions needed. This sparkle bottle has a nice flow to it, and it provides about 3 to 4 minutes of glittery amusement. When you first shake it, it will have some nice swirls and then the glitter gently disperses. I put black glitter fine glitter in this one, so it’s fun to watch it transform to a completely different color.

Proportions: Since all bottles are different sizes, I’m breaking this down into proportions instead of specifics. If your calm down bottle does not work with these proportions, the troubleshooting guide at the bottom will help you figure out how to save your bottle. Allow for a little bit of room at the top in case you need more water or glue. If you have to add more, you should be able to shake it at that point and have it blend easily.

This calm down jar is made with about 20% glue, 80% water, and as much glitter as desired.

Make it: Pour Elmer’s clear glue and hot water into the mixing bowl, along with some Liquid Watercolor or food coloring, and glitter. Now mix with the whisk. When everything is blended, mix vigorously then pour right away into the water bottle. The last stir helps get the glitter to transfer to the water bottle instead of settling in the mixing bowl. I just add a  bit more hot water to the mixing bowl if there is some that is stuck. Then I clean the residual glitter out with a paper towel before rinsing and cleaning it out.

Feel free to put the lid on and shake away to make sure your calm down jar is working it’s magic.  If your bottle isn’t functioning quite right, see the troubleshooting guide below. After your bottle is just the way you like it, let it cool without the lid.  Once it has cooled, I put the lid back on and secure it with hot glue or super glue.

How to Make a Calm Down Jar with Elmer’s Glitter Glue

6 Ways to Make a Calm Down Jar by Preschool Inspirations Additional Ingredients:

Elmer’s Washable Glitter Glue

Updated Note: This is the hardest calm down jar to make by far. I would consider this calm down jar “expert level.” If you want one that is easy, avoid this one. If you are a sensory bottle pro, then you’ll enjoy the challenge!

This bottle reminds me of the galaxy when I look at it. It even requires one less ingredient since you don’t even need to color the water, unlike all the other calm down jars. It also caused me the most problems, but I think I’ve worked out all the kinks so you can successfully do yours without the hassle. I like to call this the “long lasting calm down jar” because the glitter suspends for over an hour. This bottle has only a tiny bit of swirl initially then the glitter just floats…for what seems like forever!

6 Ways to Make a Calm Down Jar by Preschool Inspirations

Proportions: Elmer’s glitter glue is super strength, so start with less. If you use different glitter glue, it will make a completely different calm down jar with results that may not be similar to this. With that said, if you want to use regular glitter glue, I say go for it and let me know how yours turns out!

In my jar my proportions were 20% Elmer’s glitter glue and 80% water. As long as you leave room at the top, you can always add more Elmer’s glitter glue or water if needed.

Make it: Mix the glitter glue and hot water with the whisk in a container. Then stir in some extra glitter. Pour the mixture into the empty water bottle and let the water come to room temperature before sealing the lid on. If you cannot get the glitter to fall down, you will need to water it down. If you need to add more glitter glue, you can put some at the small space you left at the top. As long as the water is still warm, it should mix together fairly well with some good shaking.

This bottle is incredibly beautiful and was worth all the extra work it took me to figure it out. And don’t forget to super glue the lid on once it’s as beautiful as you want it to be.

How to Make a Calm Down Jar with Corn Syrup

6 Ways to Make a Calm Down Jar by Preschool Inspirations Additional Ingredients:

Karo Light Corn Syrup (Clear colored)

 

I’m not going to be mean and make you wait until the end to hear about my favorite. This is the one I love the most! The glitter suspends for about four and a half minutes, and it has the long-lasting swirls that I just love to watch. There’s even a quick video of it on my instagram account  that you can watch.

It’s not the cheapest, but it’s well worth it to me. We’ve had ours for over two years, and I still can’t get enough of it. I’m also much better at sharing it :).

My Alphabet Calm Down Jar is also made of corn syrup if you are looking for another use!

Proportions: My jar is 1/3 corn syrup and 2/3 water which is also combined with a small container of glitter glue (from the dollar store) and a bunch of squeezes of Make It Glitter. There is not fine glitter in this jar because when I made it I didn’t have any at the time. From other reader’s comments, it sounds that fine glitter is not the best option for this bottle unless you add some dish soap. See the troubleshooting tips below because the glitter can stick together at the top unless you use Make It Glitter.

Corn syrup is not available worldwide. It is sold in the baking aisle of the store if you do have it.

Make it: Mix corn syrup, hot water, glitter, and Liquid Watercolor and whisk together. When everything is blended, mix vigorously then pour right away into the water bottle. The last stir helps get the glitter to transfer to the water bottle instead of settling in the mixing bowl. I just add a  bit more hot water to the mixing bowl if there is some that is stuck. Then I clean the residual glitter out with a paper towel before rinsing and cleaning it out.

Feel free to put the lid on and shake away to make sure your calm down jar is working it’s magic. Then I leave the lid off until the water lowers to the room temperature. If your bottle isn’t functioning quite right, see the troubleshooting guide below. After your bottle is just the way you like it, let it cool without the lid.  Once it has cooled, I put the lid back on and secure it with hot glue or super glue.

How to Make a Calm Down Jar with Tacky Glue

6 Ways to Make a Calm Down Jar by Preschool Inspirations Additional Ingredients:

Clear Tacky Glue

This bottle also has the long-lasting swirls that are similar to the ones in bottle #3. The glitter suspends for about three minutes, and this one is always so fun to watch. Clear tacky glue is not sold at many grocery stores, so you may want to look for it at a craft store. I found mine at Wal-Mart in the craft section.

Proportions: My bottle is 1/4 tacky glue and 3/4 water.

Make it: Pour clear tacky glue and hot water into the mixing bowl, along with some Liquid Watercolor or food coloring, and glitter. Now mix with the whisk. When everything is blended, mix vigorously then pour right away into the water bottle. The last stir helps get the glitter to transfer to the water bottle instead of settling in the mixing bowl. I just add a  bit more hot water to the mixing bowl if there is some that is stuck. Then I clean the residual glitter out with a paper towel before rinsing and cleaning it out.

Feel free to put the lid on and shake away to make sure your calm down jar is working it’s magic. Then I leave the lid off until the water lowers to the room temperature. If your bottle isn’t functioning quite right, see the troubleshooting guide below. After your bottle is just the way you like it, let it cool without the lid.  Once it has cooled, I put the lid back on and secure it with hot glue or super glue.

How to Make a Calm Down Jar with Liquid Soap

6 Ways to Make a Calm Down Jar by Preschool Inspirations Additional Ingredients:

Softsoap (clear liquid hand soap)

I get the clear kind in bulk from Costco since we use it on a regular basis, or this would work if you need to find something smaller online: Softsoap Hand Soap

This recipe is great because I know that lots of family child care providers, preschools, and daycares use this type of soap and have it on hand, and it is sold in bulk at Costco. I’m not sure if other brands will work the same way unfortunately, but if you try it, please let me know!  This calm down bottle is fun because the glitter flows extra fast, and it still has the swirling effect. This bottle suspends the glitter for about a minute. If you want it to last longer, just add a bit of corn syrup or glue from one of the other bottles.

Proportions: Half of this bottle is Softsoap and the other half is water.

Make it: Mix the Softsoap, water, Liquid Watercolor, and glitter together. When everything is blended, whisk vigorously then pour right away into the water bottle. The last stir helps get the glitter to transfer to the water bottle instead of settling in the mixing bowl. I just add a  bit more hot water to the mixing bowl if there is some that is stuck. Then I clean the residual glitter out with a paper towel before rinsing and cleaning it out.

Feel free to put the lid on and shake away to make sure your calm down jar is working it’s magic. Then I leave the lid off until the water lowers to the room temperature. If your bottle isn’t functioning quite right, see the troubleshooting guide below. After your bottle is just the way you like it, let it cool without the lid.  Once it has cooled, I put the lid back on and secure it with hot glue or super glue.

How to Make a Calm Down Jar with Glycerine

6 Ways to Make a Calm Down Jar by Preschool Inspirations Additional Ingredients:

Glycerine

This bottle has very similar effects to the Softsoap bottle. It has some swirling and then lots of floating. Mine suspends the glitter for about a minute and a half. If you would like to increase that time, you could use more glycerine or add glue. I completely ran out of glycerin, otherwise I would have added more. This was also tricky to find at the store. I special ordered mine from a pharmacy, but next time I would just order from Amazon because it’s much more affordable than my special order was!

Proportions: My calm down jar was 1/3 glycerin and 2/3 water.

Make it: Mix the glycerin and hot water together with a whisk in a mixing bowl along with food coloring or Liquid Watercolor and glitter.

When everything is blended, whisk vigorously then pour right away into the water bottle. The last stir helps get the glitter to transfer to the water bottle instead of settling in the mixing bowl. I just add a  bit more hot water to the mixing bowl if there is some that is stuck. Then I clean the residual glitter out with a paper towel before rinsing and cleaning it out.

Feel free to put the lid on and shake away to make sure your calm down jar is working it’s magic. Then I leave the lid off until the water lowers to the room temperature. If your bottle isn’t functioning quite right, see the troubleshooting guide below. After your bottle is just the way you like it, let it cool without the lid.  Once it has cooled, I put the lid back on and secure it with hot glue or super glue.

Choosing the best water bottle

I love the sleek look of the Voss Plastic Bottles. It has a nice big opening so that you could add objects to it. The lid is the same size as the base, so a child can easily flip it over and over. They are not readily available everywhere though.  If you get the extra tall one, it’s quite a bit heavier. I dropped bottle #3 the first day I made it, and the lid broke. Ours is still useable, but it’s just something to keep in mind. You can find my top bottle recommendations in this post which is all about How to Make a Perfect Sensory Bottle.

6 Ways to Make a Calm Down Jar by Preschool Inspirations

Other sleek bottles from the grocery store also work well. You can find bottles in all sizes, and I especially love making the tiny sized ones for infants and toddlers! My calm down jar #1 is a Smart Water bottle, and #3 is the large VOSS bottle.

I prefer the plastic containers, but I know many people who use the glass ones. In a classroom setting, I would highly recommend plastic, but in a home, I think it’s just best to know your own child and make that call.

Troubleshooting Help

The glitter is not moving. If this happens to you, then you have put in too much glue, glitter glue, or corn syrup. Pour the mixture into a large bowl and add more hot water then whisk away. Pour it back into the jar once it’s as fast as you would like. Then you might have enough extra for an additional small calm down jar. Keep in mind that Elmer’s glitter glue is really slow. If you want the glitter in your bottle to fall in a couple of minutes, I wouldn’t go that route.

The glitter collects at the top. I had an awesome reader submit this problem! If your glitter collects at the top, a few drops of dish soap should help. To read more about this problem and to see what it look like, visit Momma Owl’s Lab to read her post on Glitter Jars. Additionally, use Make It Glitter instead of regular glitter.

My solution is globby and clumpy. In this case, you need to blend all the ingredients together more. Sometimes vigorous shaking can help with this. If it doesn’t, you need to warm the solution because the water was not warm enough. Pour the solution into a saucepan on very low while stirring regularly for about five to ten minutes. You’ll see the different parts become more uniform and then you’ll know it’s done. Pour it  back into the bottle when it looks blended.

6 Ways to Make a Calm Down Jar by Preschool Inspirations

My glitter falls too fast. If you want your glitter to stay afloat a little longer, add some corn syrup or glue to your bottle. That will slow the process down with very little effort.

There are no swirls. If you desire extra swirls, the corn syrup or the clear tacky glue should do the trick. Just add some of that to your bottle, and the swirls will be on their way.

Can I Alter These Recipes?

Absolutely! You could mix a little bit of this and that from the above recipes to make your own unique concoction. That’s part of the fun in making a calm down jar. I’d love to hear about it if you made a combination of these ingredients and how it turned out.

I hope these recipes will be just what you need on how to make a calm down jar!

Don’t have extra time and need an alternative?

I understand the life of a busy mom and teacher! It took me months to get around to making these. If you are short on time or need something affordable quickly, these are also great options.

Related Posts:

Color Mixing Sensory Bottles

How to Make Color Changing Sensory or Discovery Bottles by Preschool Inspirations-3

Magnetic Discovery Bottle

Magnetic Discovery Bottles ~ Preschool Inspirations

Alphabet Discovery Bottle

Alphabet Discovery Bottle by Preschool Inspirations-7

Follow Katie | Preschool Inspiration’s Discovery Bottles board on Pinterest.

More Calm Down Jars

Would you like to see more? Visit these other bloggers and see their amazing calm down jars:

LEGO Calm Down Jar from Lemon Lime Adventures

Glowing Sensory Bottle for Bedtime from Kids Activities Blog

Relaxation Jars from Play Dr. Mom

Relax Bottle from My Crazy Blessed Life

Hush Bottle from In Lieu of Preschool

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Comments

  1. says

    What a WONDERFUL post! I love how you’ve included the 6 different ways … AND some troubleshooting! Thanks SO much for including a link to my post as well!

    • Katie says

      I’m so glad you have enjoyed it, PlayDrMom! Your post has such great and helpful tips about working with glitter glue :). It’s a pleasure to have you visit!

      • Ashmitha Arun says

        Hey Katie!
        You are wonderful! I am gonna try this this weekend! I have a doubt……. Can u use only glue, hot water, glitter and soap dish? like leaving out the glycerine/food coloring/corn syrup?

        • Katie says

          You can definitely leave out any and all of those things. I love the colored ones, but I bet a clear one would still be pretty. Glue will suspend the glitter longer than soap, but I have never tried them both together :). Keep us updated!

          • Pauline says

            I used glitter glue and soap! So just the glitter glue was collecting on top, but the soap made it fall right away. Just be careful not to use too much like I did! It creates a lot of bubbles. Corn syrup helped slow it down, but not the much. It’s possible it was the glue I used since it was just dollar store glue. Maybe a higher quality glue will work better next time. The child I’m making it for likes shaking things so how long it takes to settle isn’t the biggest deal in my case. Hope that helps!

          • Katie says

            Oh great tips! Thanks for sharing. It seems that the glitter glue gives problems and trouble more than anything else. I am so glad you got your modified calm down jar to work!

    • Katie says

      VOSS are definitely my favorite, Marie! They’re becoming more readily available, and all of the grocery stores around me carry them now.

    • Katie says

      I hope you and your sweetie had a wonderful time making them. And thank you so much for sharing, Crystal!

  2. katie says

    Would it work to add some corn syrup to the first option? Our local MOPs group is going to be making these as our craft soon, and I’d like to go the cheaper route since we will be making quite a few. But, I like the idea of more swirls! Thanks!

  3. Gina says

    I tried the Elmer’s Glitter Glue version (the purple bottle) like 8 different times today. The “extra glitter” (I used fine glitter, in varied proportions with every attempt) just floated to the top, and the glitter glue only sort-of floated to the bottom, even after I put so much water in the bottle that the glitter was pretty sparse. Suuuuch a bummer. 🙁

    • Katie says

      Oh no, Gina! I can completely relate to being frustrated with this calm down jar. It is definitely the trickiest and most difficult. If you still have your glitter glue concoction, use my method to blend it with the sauce pan on the stove and see if that does the trick. That’s what I had to do to salvage mine. And the glitter does suspend for a loooong time. It takes hours for mine to fall down. None of the other bottles gave me nearly the trouble if you are up to trying one of them.

  4. Brittney says

    I’m wanting to make #3, but have to order the supplies. When you say a small bottle of glitter glue, how small? Can’t wait to try it!

  5. says

    I really do love these calm down jars I’m planning on doing them for school. So I have some questions, what is 20% and 80% measured out and if you use glitter paint do you use liquid food coloring

    • Katie says

      Hi Sweetypie! They are so fun, so I hope you can make some great ones :). The measurements are in percentages because every bottle is a different size, so I really cannot say what the precise amounts would be in your case. As long as you are close, the bottle should still work! And I haven’t ever tried paint instead of liquid water coloring, but I’d love to hear if it works!

  6. Robin says

    I made a bunch at the beginning of the school year, one for my own kiddo and three for my first graders. I really liked staples ‘ colored glitter glue, and a sample pack of fine glitter in multiple colors and shapes..in addition to the clear glue….I love when one of my firsties is having a bad day, their classmates grab them one of these first thing to help them calm down!

  7. Terryl says

    Hi there I made the solution with corn syrup, hot water and glitter. I could only find fine glitter locally. I mixed it all my ingredients and the glitter all collected on the top. I heated it in a sauce pan and still the same issue, its all collected on the top 🙁 any other ideas?

    • Katie says

      Ugh! I’m so sorry the glitter is stuck! I’m wondering if it’s the type of glitter you have. If you send me a photo by messaging me on facebook, I might be able to help you out better :).

  8. Caitlyn says

    Hello! I’m a school therapist and I’m hoping to make a few of these for the upcoming year. I love option 3 and I’m wondering if it would work to make different proportions (1/3 to 2/3, then 1/2 to 1/2, etc) to make the glitter float for a shorter or longer time. I hope I worded that well!

    • Katie says

      Hi Caitlyn! I hope your kiddos love this! You can definitely vary the corn syrup and water, and it should do that. I haven’t tried it, so I don’t know the exact results. Otherwise, if you make the ones with glycerin or soap, those I know are definitely quicker at letting the glitter fall. Enjoy!

  9. caroline says

    Still trying to figure mine out but super excited with all the tips and trouble shooting. I learned from my work you can use a hairdryer to melt or loosen the label on anything, it will just peel right off.

  10. says

    Thank you so much for this post! I’d seen so many variations across the internet, I was too overwhelmed to start. It’s so nice to have a good variety in one place so I can choose one and make it! Your pictures and descriptions are super-helpful!

    • Katie says

      Hi Marsha! Anything with sleek sides would work well! They usually have flavored water in them at the store. Just use anything you find to be inviting, and you’ll be set :).

  11. Claire says

    I tried this today, with the glitter glue method (I’m still hunting for the other ingredients) and I got bubbles on shaking. I got suspended glitter too but because of the bubbles and I’m a bit reluctant to add dish soap and get…. More bubbles. Do you scoop the bubbles out?

    • Katie says

      Hi Claire! The glitter glue one is definitely tricky. I’ve not had bubbles from it, but it does do weird things from time to time! Suggestions that I’ve heard from others about this bottle (but not specifically bubbles) is to whisk it again or to heat up the water super hot. I use boiling water in fact. Try those, and hopefully they will help. If not, any other bottle will have less trouble! Best of luck to you!

      • Claire says

        Thanks Katie. I eventually sorted it out (one of them at least). I used boiling water initially so that wasn’t part of the solution. I used dish soap in one and it did stop the floating and give me a nice clean line where the water settled but it created way too many bubbles and trying to get them out ultimately killed that bottle. The other bottle I didn’t do dish soap but added more water, cut out the air and squeezed out the bubbles each time after vigorous shaking. I read somewhere (maybe here) that you get bubbles when you use washable glitter glue. My bottle didn’t say it was washable but it may have been. I also read something about air and putting more water into my bottle (thereby reducing air space) seemed to be part of the solution too and, in the end, gave me the nice sharp line that I got more quickly with the dish soap. It ended up in a bottle that was too thin for the time I wanted (settling too fast) but now I have the idea I can try again. I also got some glycerol and glucose syrup today. No lucky of clear tacky glue around here.

          • Claire says

            I’ve had the same floating problem with glycerine and glucose syrup formulas so I’m going to have to try a different type of glitter. I’ve been using fine/regular but I will try glitter glue or the bottles with bigger bits to see if that helps. I tried adding a lot of glitter so the floating didn’t matter as much and thats when I first say the awesome swirling but I lost them when I syphoned out the bubbles. There’s obviously a lot more science involved that just viscosity.

  12. Angela says

    well, this was harder than I had anticipated. The glue made the water milky (I imagine it was too much of it) and trying to replicate the corn syrup recipe, my glitter only was suspended for 40 seconds or so. After reading the link to Momma Owl’s Lab post, I was able to tweak the batch I had already made and salvage it, I am making 4 jars as gifts to my co-workers (we are therapists). I added pretty much everything she suggested until it all came together, so I am not sure I could recreate it. I added salt, soap, and a ton more corn syrup. Now the glitter takes about 2 minutes to fall and makes beautiful swirls.
    Thank you so much for the post and the great ideas.

    • Katie says

      What a thoughtful gift!! I’m so glad you could make them all work. I think the Make It Glitter solution really makes things a lot easier. I will be adding on a SUPER easy way to make a calm down jar here soon…like 10 seconds easy!

      • Claire says

        I had similar problems Angela and I too hope to make them for the therapy room, once I have refined the technique. I think they will be great when clients need to calm down, be mindful or wait while you duck out to copy something. For what it’s worth, I would the glyercine formula the most successful. Glitter was suspended for about 3 minutes in the end. I don’t have access to make it glitter so that was as good as it was going to get.

  13. Claire says

    Did any one find that their karo ones went … off? I did mine with glucose syrup which is a local equivalent and I left one with the lid unglued because I was still refining the consistency I wanted. Within about a week it smelt really odd (and not in a good way) and was making a gas. Are the sealed ones likely to explode at some point?

  14. Farin says

    Thanks so much for posting. I think your green tacky glue bottle is amazing, what glitter colors/sizes did you use to get such a great effect? I’d guess green liquid watercolor with fine gold and larger green glitter? Your photography really makes all your bottles look excellent. Can’t wait to make!

    • Katie says

      Thank you so much, Farin! It’s green liquid watercolor with just silver fine glitter. The glitter does definitely look gold once it mixes with the green though. Isn’t that so cool! You have a great eye for detail. Enjoy making yours!

  15. Hayley says

    I tried the one with tacky glue and got a lot of foam :(. Did I add too much water or glue? The foam will eventually settle after a long while. Thanks again for posting this!

    • Katie says

      I think you have too much glue (although I could be wrong). This is what I would do to find out for sure. After shaking your bottle and getting all of the ingredients nice and mixed up, pour half of it into another bottle. Then add more water to one of them and see if it helps. And of course if it doesn’t, you’ll know that you need to add more glue. I definitely have foam in my bottle, but it’s all covered by the silver lid. I hope this helps and good luck :). Let us know what you find out!

  16. Adrienne says

    Thank you so much for this wonderful article! I made 5 bottles (out of an intended 6) with the glitter glue for my kids. 2 bottles per floor, one for my son, one for my daughter! My son is on the spectrum (high functioning) and my daughter is right in the turmoil of being a toddler, so I wanted something to help them calm down on their own. When I got around to making bottle #6, I decided to try making the clear hand soap version. I need to tweak it a bit to make the glitter settle more slowly, but that’s my favourite one! I’ve decided to re-make the other 5 bottles with the soap, so I donated the first “batch” to my son’s teacher. Hopefully they’ll help the other autistic kids in his class calm down too! And an added bonus to these bottles is that my kids know that their time-out is done “when the sparkles all go to the bottom” and they can get up when that happens. No more need for me to be looming over them, telling them to stay put! lol

    • Katie says

      I LOVE that you donated some, Adrienne! I think the class will absolutely benefit from them. How fun to hear the one that you liked the best. I’m super impressed you made them all. Thank you for the lovely comment :).

  17. Malavika says

    Hi Katie,

    Thanks a lot for such a detailed post. I read the post completely and then decided which one was going to be the easiest way to make it. I zeroed in on the method that uses the clear glue. I got all my ingredients (glue, food colour, bottle and glitter) and within a few minutes I had an amazingly satisfying calming bottle. My daughter even helped me in making it and now she is demanding for more different coloured ones 🙂 I too can’t help but oblige they are so so pretty.
    One small tip for those who used bottles that had labels on them. Fill the bottle completely with water and then soak it in a bucket/mug filled with water for an hour or so. Take it out and peel off whatever part of the label you can with your hands. The stubborn and sticky part of the label can then be removed easily using an old toothbrush and a little quantity of liquid hand wash.
    I stumbled upon your website just before I was about to spend a lot on one of the bottles online. The cost was almost a hundered and fifty times more(in Indian Rupees) than what the raw materials cost me. Also, making it myself gave me and my daughter some quality time to spend together. Thanks one again for this post.

    • Katie says

      Great suggestion! I adore that you enjoyed making this with your daughter. You sound like an amazing mother :). Enjoy and thanks for the comment.

  18. bumblebee says

    Hey KatieI
    because I did not want to spent so much money to order Corn Syrup online, I mixed a lot of Sugar into a little water (maybe 80/20 to begin with, I didnt measure) and ot really good results. Depending on the amount of the later added water, the flow was really slow up to eternal 😉 and the liquid became in a few hours nice and clear.
    It also took some hours for the glitter to really mix with the fluid.
    I can send by occasion some fotos if you like.

    • Katie says

      I started with a teaspoon and went from there, but I made it sooo long ago that I don’t remember the exact amount.

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